When, Where, and How: Shot Charts Help You Find Your Hot Spots

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Shot charts show you where an offense excels and struggles, and pairing them with video allows for valuable insights.

The best way to craft an effective offense is to get your best shooters launching from where they’re most efficient. Chasing that data led to the creation of the shot chart, as coaches often had assistants charting makes and misses from the bench or while watching the video afterward.

But relegating a shot chart to a piece of paper is exercising only a fraction of its ability. Hudl allows you to craft nearly any shot chart for your team or an individual player based on shot type, quarter/half and zone breakdown. You can call up your own shot chart or see how opponents have done against you, exposing holes in your defense.

Video Brings Shot Charts to Life

Shot charts are taken to a whole new level when connected to video. With one click you can call up all shots from that specific area, saving you the time of having to hunt through game video and find specific moments. It’s an edge that the nation’s best programs have fully embraced.

“You can go back and watch all the times they were in the corner, all the times they’ve taken runners, all the times they’ve had a hook shot in the paint,” Kevin Cullen, the Director of Information Technology for Duke basketball, said. “You can look at that right away and see not only were they 4 for 5, but here are the four times they made it and the one time they didn’t.”

If a post player struggles from one block but excels from the other, call up video from both spots to see what he or she is doing differently. Tired of watching your opponent rain 3-pointers from the corner? Check out the video and find the holes in your rotation.

Click the play arrow to see the short video

You can’t put a value on that,” Ryan Fretz of Clyde High (Ohio) said. “You really can’t. Just to be able to click on that and look at what type of shots he’s taking, you stick it right in the scouting report – 75 percent of his shots came off a down screen. Three of his 10 shots were catch-and-shoot, the rest were all taking it to the hole. It allows us to get that edge, to know what the guy is going to do before he gets the ball.”

Shot Charts Provide Clarity

Our minds simply aren’t capable of being completely objective, especially in the heat of battle. That’s something Chris Horton, the women’s coach at Lone Oak High (Texas) realized, but going through shot charts after the game brings things back into balance.

“When you’re in the games, you’re just in the flow of things,” he said. “My assistant coaches see it and we talk about who’s doing what. But in terms of what particular areas they’re scoring from, it’s hard to see until afterward. When I can look at the chart and see what’s going on, I’ll click on the specific area and that’ll pull up video.

“If I’ve got a girl that’s having trouble scoring inside, why? What’s she doing? It helps me coach them. It helps me big picture with offensive design, but it also helps me help them. I’ll go into each individual area and I’ll pull up the video. It helps me as a team concept and it helps me individually. I’ve had them start looking at their own stuff.”

Scout Like a Pro

Shot charts aren’t limited to learning about your own team. Use the data to find out where your opposition tries to get shots and craft your defense to keep them out of those spots. If there is an area where your opponent struggles, try to get them in that space more often.

Christian Selich, the women’s coach at Millington High (Mich.) has found great value in scouting opponents through shot charts and brings a TV into the locker room a few times each week to lay out the game plan to his players.

“There are certain opponents that we know shoot well from a certain spot and this is a spot that we don’t defend well, maybe we’ll spend some extra time in practice defending this area so we’re not giving up points,” he said.

Shot charts have always been useful, but their evolution has turned them into one of the most important weapons in a coach’s arsenal. To get more information on Hudl’s stat reports, check out this blog.

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2 NCAA After Time Out Plays

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This post contains two man to man after timeout plays.

The fist play is from UCLA’s Steve Alford.

The second is from Dr. John Giannini’s LaSalle Explorers.

Adjust these sets to fit your players and philosophy and/or take bits and pieces to combine with what you already run.

The plays are from The Best of Special Teams Playbook assembled by Chris Filios.

The playbook contains 210 basketball plays from 40 different NCAA teams.

It is paired with Faces in New Places 2017 as this week’s eBook special.

You can find out more about what is included in the bundle at this link:

Best of Special Teams Playbook and Faces in New Places 2017

You can also get any two of our eBooks for $25 at this link: 2 eBooks for $25

If you have any questions, feel free to call/text me at 765-366-9673 or email me at [email protected]

UCLA Staggers

 

1 passes to 3 coming off a staggered double screen from 2 and 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 screens for 2 to curl to the elbow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 passes back to 1.

4 Ducks into the lane to set up a screen for 2.

3 comes off a back screen from 5.

 

 

 

 

2 comes off a triple staggered screen from 4, 3, and 5.

 

 

 

 

 

LaSalle Fake HO DHO

 

5 brakes to the elbow and receives the entry pass from 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 cuts around 5 for a fake hand off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 runs a dribble hand off and roll with 3.

You could also fake this one and have 5 take the ball to the basket on the dribble.

The intent of the post is not that you have to run the plays as is, but for them to get you thinking about things that would work for you.

 

The plays are from The Best of Special Teams Playbook assembled by Chris Filios.

The playbook contains 210 basketball plays from 40 different NCAA teams.

It is paired with Faces in New Places 2017 as this week’s eBook special.

You can find out more about what is included in the bundle at this link:

Best of Special Teams Playbook and Faces in New Places 2017

You can also get any two of our eBooks for $25 at this link: 2 eBooks for $25

If you have any questions, feel free to call/text me at 765-366-9673 or email me at [email protected]

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Size Disadvantage Finishing Moves

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3 Finishing moves for players at a size disadvantage from Drew Hanlen.

Drew is an NBA skills trainer and founder of Pure Sweat Basketball.

This video is posted in the Pure Sweat You Tube channel. You can access their channel of instructional videos at this link:

Pure Sweat You Tube Channel

This is a You Tube video, so please make sure that you are able to access that network.

Also, please make sure your sound is on for the instruction with the video.

 

 

 

 

3 Small Guard Finishing Moves

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Veer Back Pick and Roll Defense

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This post was originally from Zak Boisvert on his basketball Coaching Website: Pick and Pop

His You Tube channel has several videos with various types of man to man plays, zone sets, and inbounds plays. You can subscribe to receive an update when he posts a new video Zak Boisvert You Tube Channel

You can follow him on Twitter at this link: @ZakBoisvert

This is how Coach Boisvert described the video:

Embedded below is a video I put together exploring the NBA defensive concept of “Veer-Backs.” Through the first 5 days of the playoffs, you’re seeing a ton of these teams executing veer-backs on a lot of middle pick & rolls.

Make sure that your sound is on and that you are connected to a server that give you acccess to You Tube Videos.

The first few clips are using a Veer back

I have also posted some notes below the video from as well as some links to other resources from Pikandpop.net from NBA coaches on defending pick and roll.

The video includes clips of: Veer Back vs. 1) Snake on a Middle Pick and Roll, 2) Pick and Pop 3) Side Pick and Roll 4) Icing a Side Pick and Roll and finishes with a triple switch.

Ron Adams, Golden State Warriors Defensive Guru, FIBA Basketball Coaches Clinic

Diagrams created with FastDraw

-As soon as guard hears the “Flat” call by his teammate, he presses into the ball-handler and directs him towards the screen and then he chases the ball over the top of the screen.

-In “Flat,” the screener’s defender slides with the ball. The worse the screener is as a shooter, the deeper the big defender gets on this “Flat” coverage. The shooting ability of the screener dictates the depth of our “Flat” more than the shooting ability of the ball-handler (although against a great shooting point guard, we won’t utilize “Flat” much).

-Veerback: If the ball-handler gets too deep and attacks the big, the guard calls “Veerback” to tell the big (x5) that there’s a switch. X5 will keep 1 in front while x1 veers back and drives his butt into 5 on his roll.

-Big-to-big communication is so vital. They’re playing defense together.

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Rebounding League

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This competitive team rebounding drill is demonstrated by Bradley Men’s Coach Brian Wardle.

This rebounding drill to emphasize to your players the importance of competing to rebound is scored over a series of practices.

The drill is a 3 minute drill.

You get a point for a defensive rebound and get to stay on defense with the inside rebounding position.

The idea of the post is to stimulate ideas. You should change the rules, scoring, timing, expectations, techniques, and emphasis of any other coaches’ drills that you see anywhere to fit your team’s needs.

There is sound with the video, so please make sure that your sound is on.

The video is hosted on You Tube, so you will need to be on a network that allows you to access that site.

Click the play arrow to play the video with the drill.

If you are interested in learning more about the Championship Productions Basketball Coaching DVD that this drill came from, you can click the following link: Brian Wardle: Building a Rebounding and Defensive Mindset

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Zig Zag Alley Drill

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This one on one defensive drill came from the FastModel Sports Basketball Plays and Drills Library.

You can also find out more about FastModel Play Diagramming software by clicking this link: FastDraw

The drill was contributed by Rory Hamilton, Norman North High School. Here is what Coach Hamilton had to say about the drill:

You can use this in your improvement season skill development drills or during practices.

The drill starts with defensive player handing the offensive player the ball and assuming a legal guarding position. The offensive player establishes triple threat and looks to beat the defensive player 1 on 1 in the alley (lane to sideline). The goal of the defensive player is to get the offense to change directions twice before half court.

Once the offensive player reaches half court, he or she will pass to the coach at the top of the key. The defensive must sprint to the level of the ball and communicate “help”. The offensive player continues to the wing and uses a V-cut or L-cut to get open on the wing. The coach then will passes the ball to the player on the wing and defense closes out according to your defensive principles. On a catch, the offensive player only has three dribbles and must stay on one side of the floor.

When guarding the offensive player and finishing the drill, coaches make sure each shot is challenged and followed by a box-out. You can make this drill competitive and have punitive consequences based upon what your team needs. For example, if you are having difficulty challenging shots than make every shot not contested have a consequence.

Find what your team needs and make it a priority in the drill.

 

Zig Zag live to 1/2 court.

Defense tries to get at least two change of directions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

&nbs;

 

Once at half court, the offensive player then throws the ball ahead to coach at top of the key (4) and proceeds to play live 1 on 1 in the sideline alley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Offense can use an L cut or V cut to get open and then is limited to 3 dribbles upon a catch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On a catch, the offensive player only has three dribbles and must stay on one side of the floor.

When guarding the offensive player and finishing the drill, coaches make sure each shot is challenged and followed by a box-out.

 

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3 Basketball Finishing Moves

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The Coach in the video is PGC Basketball Director Tyler Coston.

This video was filmed at the PGC/Glazier Spring 2016 Chicago Clinic.

If you want the best in basketball education, then you need to attend the PGC/Glazier Basketball Clinics this Spring!

They’ve changed the coaching clinic game forever with more topics, superior speakers, and a staff pass that includes unlimited coaches from your school.

2017 Spring Clinic Dates

Whether you agree or disagree with his opinions, I hope you might be able to find a teaching point or term that you can use in your program.

The moves he talks through and demonstrates are the:

1) Sweep Over
2) Dribble-Drop-Close Spin Move
3) Floater

Make sure your sound is on to hear the presentation

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5 Basketball Finishing Moves

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The Coach in the video is Washington Women’s Head Coach Mike Neighbors.

This video was filmed at the PGC/Glazier Spring 2016 Chicago Clinic.

If you want the best in basketball education, then you need to attend the PGC/Glazier Basketball Clinics this Spring!

They’ve changed the coaching clinic game forever with more topics, superior speakers, and a staff pass that includes unlimited coaches from your school.

 

 

2017 Spring Clinic Dates

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Maximizing the Capacity for Excellence

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These notes on connecting mental and physical toughness are from Mental Toughness Training for Basketball by Mike Voight and Jeff House. I hope that you can use it as a model to think about ways to help your players improve. I like that it breaks down mental toughness into different capacities. Players have different mental strengths and weaknesses just like they have different strengths and weaknesses to their game.

“Nowhere is it more abundantly clear than in competitive sports that everything is interconnected. What you think, how you act, what you eat, how much you sleep, your fighting spirit, your fitness, your passion for life are all intimately connected”
—Jim Loehr, Ed.D., Mental Skills Trainer

Below are some questions for players to answer that can help them gain a better awareness of their present capacity level. Before a player can operate to his/her maximal capacities, he/she must be aware of his current level and how far it may be from his top effort.

Upon getting responses from each player and/or the team as a whole, individual/ team meetings with players can be conducted to discuss specific areas that players need to commit to improving, as well as to list the players’ areas of strengths. Coaches who take the time to talk about specific ways to maximize each athlete’s capacities show the athletes how committed they are in assisting the players in their pursuit.

The critical piece to this model is that your athletes and the team are being asked the “right” questions—questions that range across the seven different capacities.

Another exercise is to ask your players to determine the percentage of their mistakes that are due to each of these seven components.

Another activity is to have players brainstorm why they have not been able to accomplish their preferred goals due to barriers in these seven components. Then the players should be asked to brainstorm some solutions to these barriers. The feedback gathered during these exercises can be an
important foundation for subsequent team goal-setting sessions targeting solutions to common team problems and barriers.

 

Inspiration
What do you love about the game?
What are your reasons for playing the game and the position?
What makes you the happiest while playing?
What is your paying philosophy?
What drives you? What do you want to accomplish?

Emotional toughness 
Are you a risk taker?
Do you deal well with changes?
Do you try new ways to improve your game?
Do you cope well with your frustration?

Mental Toughness for Mechanics
Do you use a pre-practice and pre-game routine?
Does your focus fade during practice or games?
Are you confident regardless of how you’re playing?
Do you stay positive (self talk, thoughts) when you’re not playing well?

Team Play
Are you honestly committed to the team’s goals?
Do you and your positional teammates think as one?
Do you make positive contributions to the team every day?
Do you feel connected to teammates and coaches?

Technical Knowledge
Do you know the demands of your position?
Do you know all of your positional responsibilities?
Do you know the positional responsibilities of teammates
do you look for your opponent’s weaknesses/tendencies?

Technical Proficiency
Do you know your technical strengths and weaknesses?
Do you practice on your own to improve?
Do you know the specific technical elements that are faulty?
Are the majority of your practices quality sessions?

Physical Toughness
Do you adequately fuel and hydrate your body each day?
Do you ensure that you get proper sleep before games and practices?
Do you work to improve upon your flexibility?
Do you put in maximum effort on your conditioning training?

 

You can find out more about and purchase the eBook that this article is from at: Mental Toughness Training for Basketball

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33 Attack Drill

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Today’s post is more drills from a collection put together by Nate Hill, Assistant Boys Coach at Colonel Crawford High School in North Robinson Ohio.

These drills are drills to work on advantage reads that do not last very long.

He has coached for 18 years from 7th grade through Varsity Head Coach.

He has also started a basketball coaching newsletter.

You can see find more information about the Newsletter at this link: Next Level 419 Coaching Newsletter

In case you have any questions or comments for Coach Hill, here is his email address: [email protected]

 

The best use of these drills would be to use the concepts, but change the execution to fit your system.

 

 

Diagrams created with FastDraw

33 Attack

 

3 on 3 with Dribble Drive reads.

Coach starts with ball and passes to 1 who is sprinting.

1 gets ball, runs through the circle and attacks the basket.

x1 cannot leave until he touches the dribbler in the circle.

 

 

 

 

1 must make the correct read.

1 looks to pass to whoever stops him (x3 or x2).

2 and 3 also must read the driver.

Change offense and defense. Keep score like a game or come up with a scoring method that is better for your team for the purpose of this drill.

 

44 Attack

Full court 1 on 1.

Offense starts with sprint and receives pass from coach.

The defense cannot leave until offense touches top of jump circle.

Defense tries to force offense outside the elbows, offense tries to stay inside the elbows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 made layup or 2 got rebound and outlets to coach.

2 sprints back on offense. 3 runs to circle and 2 catches ball, runs thru the circle, and attacks the
rim.

1 and 3 are teammates, and 2 and 4 are teammates. 1st to 3 makes wins. Call fouls loosely. Be able to take contact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 Attack

21Attack1

1 gets pass and must run through the middle of the circle.

2 cannot leave until he touches 1.

3 cannot leave until 1 gets to circle. 1 finishes with contact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

21Attack2

 

1 is on defense, and 2 and 3 are on offense.

2 must take it out on a make.

Keep score and switch offense and defenses

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